Tag: travel photography

Nilometers Revisited

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(This is an expanded version of a previous post about nilometers. It will appear in the August 2017 edition of Egypt Today)

Nilometers were used in Egypt, particularly during the pharaonic, Roman and medieval periods, to measure the Nile’s water level during the annual summer flood.

Essentially, apart from such ritual functions they may have served in ancient Egypt, nilometers worked on the Goldilocks principle as far as the rulers of Egypt were concerned. If the water level in August–September was too high, the effects on the narrow band of fields either side of the river, and the surrounding infrastructure, would be devastating and there was no point sending out the tax collectors. If the water level was too low, the population would starve, and there was also no point sending out the tax collectors. If the water level was just right, a rich layer of alluvial silt would be deposited as the flood subsided, crops would grow, and off would go the tax collectors, no doubt singing merrily to themselves. (more…)

Roda Island Nilometer

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Nilometers were used in Egypt particularly during the pharaonic, Roman and medieval periods to measure the Nile’s water level during the annual summer flood.
Essentially, apart from any additional ritual function they had in ancient Egypt, nilometers worked on the Goldilocks principle as far as the rulers of Egypt were concerned. If the water level in August-September was too high, the effects on the narrow band of fields either side of the river, and the surrounding infrastructure, would be devastating and there was no point sending out tax collectors. If the water level was too low, the population would starve, and there was also no point sending out tax collectors. If the water level was just right, a rich layer of alluvial silt would be deposited as the flood subsided, crops would grow, and off would go the tax collectors, no doubt singing merrily to themselves.

(more…)

Wadi al-Sebua Antiqued

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Wadi al-Sebua (‘The Valley of the Lions’) lies on the west coast of Lake Nasser—the man-made lake created between 1958 and 1970 by the damming of the Nile at Aswan in Upper Egypt—and about 140 kilometers south of the dam.
There were originally two 18th dynasty, New Kingdom temples associated with the site: One built by Amenhotep III and restored by Rameses II (reigned 1279-1212 B.C.); and another speos (or ‘cave’) temple built by Rameses II.
The temple of Amenhotep—dedicated to a Nubian version of the god Horus, and later to the god Amun—was not saved from the rising waters of the lake, but the temple of Rameses, seen in the distance here, was moved about 4 kilometers west of its original position between 1961 and 1965.

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Dendera Temple Antiqued

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The complex of temples at Dendera (ancient ‘Iunet’ or ’Tantere’) lie close to the Nile about five kilometers south of Qena, and on the opposite bank (though because of the bend in the river the main temple, unusually, faces north).
The site is enclosed by a mud brick wall, covers around 40,000 square meters, and is dominated by the magnificent Greco-Roman Temple of Hathor shown here—the best preserved example of a temple from the era. (more…)

Abu Simbel Antiqued

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The story of the salvaging of the temples at Abu Simbel is well-known. To save the site from drowning under Lake Nasser—behind the Aswan Dam—the entire site was cut up into large blocks between 1964 and 1968 and reassembled at a spot 65 meters higher than the lake surface..

The Great Temple at Abu Simbel is a masterpiece of ancient engineering which probably took around 20 years to carve into the rock face, and was completed c. 1265 BC in the 24th regnal year of Rameses II. (more…)

Cairo Inside Out

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All images from Cairo Inside Out (AUC Press)

As I remember it now, the first day I landed in Egypt to take up the role of Director of AUC Press, I was whisked off in the evening to celebrate the launch of a new book. Heavily jet lagged, much of that event is lost to me, but I do remember my impressions of walking into a curious little café on the corner of two very busy streets.

The dark wood of the furniture and walls contrasted harshly with the light and color outside, but, even though the walls on two sides were framed only in glass, somehow the noise coming from the streets was deadened, providing a little sanctuary from the assault on my weary senses. (more…)

The Great Temple, Abydos

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The celebrated nineteenth dynasty pharaoh, Seti I, reigned from around 1290 to 1279 BC, and is memorialized in a temple slightly to the south of the ancient burial ground of Old Kingdom pharaohs at Abydos in Egypt. (more…)

Al-Ghuri Funerary Complex

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Al-Ghuri complex dome

In the pursuit of a bargain in the market outside, or on the way down to Bab Zuweila and the Street of the Tentmakers, it is quite possible to pass between the two halves of the Sultan al-Ghuri funerary complex—a stone’s throw away from the Khan al-Khalili—without a second thought. (more…)

Parma Cathedral Window

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The west window, Parma Cathedral

I am very fond of places that are, essentially, universities with a city attached, and the city of Parma, in the northern Italian region of Emilia-Romagna is famously home to the ancient University of Parma, as well as, of course, prosciutto (ham), and parmesan cheese.

It is a fine city to visit, as it is slightly off the tourist’s beaten track. Undeservedly so, as it has some very fine buildings—but long may it stay under the radar! (more…)

The Church of the Apostles

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The Church of The Apostles, St. Anthony's Monastery, Egypt
The Church of The Apostles, St. Anthony’s Monastery, Egypt

The Coptic monastery of Saint Anthony’s lies in the Eastern Desert of Egypt, quite a long way from anywhere, and that, of course, was the point.

Saint Anthony was born into a wealthy family in Lower Egypt circa 251 A.D.. What we know of him comes almost exclusively from a biography written by Athanasius of Alexandria, the Vita Antoni. (more…)